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about afghanistan and about women's experience in the days of the taliban, and of course under u.s. policy of our engagement there. and it's a chance to really understand how our policy is playing out through the eyes of this one story, the dressmaker, khair kahn and we would like to get your calls for this is the process of making this interactive see you all for your comment by phone order. let me give you the telephone numbers. he strolled the and -- eastern and central time zone is 202-585-3885. if you live in a mountain or how many times did you travel to afghanistan? >> guest: seven times since 2005. i spent about one third of 2008 and one-third of 2009 and a big chunk of 2009 and last year i was there for the july for the kabul conference and i was there in december about seven months pregnant working on maternal health stories. >> host: that wasn't a great way to engage with the women because of common experience. now your career as a political television producer for abc. how did you make the transition from that to writing this book? >> guest: very carefully. [laughter]
it is the taliban has the totally different vision of what is going on. they may have in mind save whatever you like mr. president. we are here and we will be here long after you leave. >> you took my next question and have already begun to answer it. let's take it all the way. if there was a central message to be taken out of vietnam, that surely was it. they were on home turf and had nowhere to go if there is a comparison to be drawn sometimes there are strategic reasons to be in afghanistan which don't or did not apply to be a non but focusing on the one central issue maybe he would follow up whenever incomplete answer that he gives. [laughter] there are analogies it definitely and if you look at what is going on like my father said in the first meeting that he is foreign policy team mike foster, not my father. [laughter] thank you. >> can i be your:father? [laughter] talking about afghanistan is not vietnam i think it has always been there with what is a comparison but yet you could say here is a reason that the u.s. went into afghanistan that is different from those reasons and there's a lot of
, it is worth reading that they destroy the taliban camps sending al qaeda running in just a few of them with a few calgary course charges and it is quite a story. but the united nations says nato took over the afghanistan campaign. and there we find another find of the coffee out. it turns out -- caveat. it turns out some allies simply do not wish to make more where there were no shooting battles. some did it one to fight unless they have helicopters there were all of these rules than pretty soon we started to see the folks who wanted to send soldiers out to the field to have almost insulting checklist so this starts to develop in buy the way i am very careful when a make a statement about the caveat because i don't mean in any way to cut down on the bravery of the troops who are helping us americans out there. and the germans are not very willing to fight because of a historical precedent. it is very difficult for the germans to get over second world war history. please don't and feud any other motive into that. so now you have a copy ought with afghanistan where we're not prepared to
the various elements of the taliban and others. but of course in the conflict of building, helping, developing projects going on designed to do one big strategic thing wherever you look in the middle east and that is to shore up the strength and responsiveness of the state's wherever we look whether it's iraq or afghanistan to prevent pakistan from continuing to fail, the idea of the two-stage solution for israel and palestine or all within the concept of the system and if we don't have strong response things are going in the wrong direction. >> host: what i see on the ground and a travel to afghanistan is to be honest with all the power of the u.s. military you have an incredibly confident will lead military. in the and that's not enough to substitute for the government's of the afghan states and institutions provide and and pushing we just never quite get there. it's hard to find anybody -- >> guest: that's true, too. this brings us back to something like democratization and the culture in their view is going to be something where the people will have a way if you change those that are going
effective going into the villages to talk to them to get good information where the taliban is in what it means to get more cohesive to stand on their own so we can get out of afghanistan as well. >> women on are bringing a new dynamic to the front line. the way that we conduct warfare is constantly involved -- devolving. longer first-generation and type of maneuvers that required total upper body strength and hiking 4 miles and doing hand combat. that is very important right now on the battlefield, forces are finding themselves not only with infantry but also diplomat and peacemaker there is a necessity to have the role of discussing to find out ways to have conflict resolution with the birth -- what ever we have it. >> host: also the upper body strength is important but we do find women have better endurance on average can run or into were more -- and two were more. evade different sets of skills that requires both sets to be the most effective military that we have. how do the guys feel having women in the overall? you have some very interesting snippets about for example, one of th
being impressed upon the various elements, the taliban and others in afghanistan. but, of course, that is in the middle of a huge complex, building, helping, developing projects that really is designed to one big grand strategic thing. were every look in the middle east, and that is to shore up the strength, the responsiveness of the state. wherever we are looking whether it is with iraq or iran today, or afghanistan, to prevent pakistan from continuing to fail. the idea of a two-state solution for israel and palestine, and they are all within the concept of this international state. that is, we don't have strong response of state. things are going in the wrong direction. >> host: what i see on the ground, and i travel often to afghanistan, is to be honest, with all the power of the u.s. military, we have an incredibly confident and well led military. in the and that's not enough to substitute for the governance that the afghans and institutions provide. and so it's like, you know, pushing a rock up a hill. we just never quite get there. i'm sure you wouldn't disagree. it's hard
. they tend to pale when the question is examined under an international scale. in 19996, the taliban made it illegal for women to attend to school in afghanistan. while this particular policy was discarded in 2001, similar deplorable circumstances still exist in afghanistan and around the world. the limitations and implications of existing education systems are far-reaching. yet there are concrete steps that can correct the damaging nature of existing education systems or the lack thereof. any institutions with international jurisdiction can and must institute global education programs including early childhood and vocational programs. early childhood education such aspiration head start provides comprehensive health, education and parent involvement to low-incomed families in the united states. vocational education is a further means of empowerment. by powering the technical skills and training to make individuals valuable members of the work force, such educational programs can also be recognized for their economic value. early childhood education as well as vocational training and educ
. we had the times square bomber inspired by them and had trained with the taliban in pakistan. yes, there are broader links but there are a few things at work here. number 1 a crippling political correctness, absolutely crippling. i think another thing, quite frankly, is that it's very difficult -- say that islam is not a religion of peace. say shari'a is a threat, that's a very difficult thing to come to grips with because that means you're at good with a good slice of the muslim population who does follow muslim fundamentally. who does follow shari'a to the t. that's a scary thing to admit for our government. >> host: and i want to go back to that because no less a person than george bush right after 9/11 said islam is a religion of peace. right after the young comes vo radical muslim walked into the airport in frankfurt and shot a couple of american soldiers, barack obama said one of the islam is one of the world's great religions. my sense we want to believe that because we are a tolerant people. but you've got quotes in this book from several known terrorists and conspirators
effective going into the villages and talking to them and getting good information about where the taliban is or who is aiding the enemy and more importantly what the town really needs in order for it to be more cohesive and stand on its own. so we can get out of afghanistan if you will. >> guest: absolutely. i think women are bringing in a new dynamic to the frontline and combat is always changing. the way that we conduct warfare is constantly evolving. we are no longer doing these first-generation force on force types of maneuvers that require that we have you no total upper body strength, that we are hiking for miles, that we are doing hand to hand combat and sure those skills are very important but right now on the battlefield forces are finding missiles confronted not only as infantrymen, but they are also fighting this ultimate role of diplomat and peacemaker where there is a necessity to have the role of discussing and finding out ways to -- combat resolution with whatever culture we are dealing with. >> host: even on the athletic field we found when we do the testing sure the guys
information about where the taliban is or who is aiding the enemy and more importantly what the town really needs in order for it to be more cohesive and stand on its own so that we can get out of afghanistan if you will. >> guest: absolutely. i think the women are bringing a new dynamic to the front line, and the combat is always changing. the way that we conduct warfare is evolving. we are no longer giving the first generation force on force maneuver that require that we have total upper body strength and we are hiking for miles, we are doing hand-to-hand combat and sure, those are important. but right now on the battlefield forces are finding themselves confronted not only has come to know, infantrymen but also finding themselves in the role of diplomat and peacemaker where there's the necessity to have the role of discussing and finding out ways to have conflict resolution with whatever culture we are dealing with. >> host: even on the athletic field, we found when we do the testing sure, they have the upper body strength, that's important and the, that i would say, but we are finding o
at least in turn did their best to repay the complement wherever they were established. the taliban, for instance, on overrunning -- [inaudible] but then their president for which one needs not travel as far back in antiquity as the roman catholic index. apartheid south africa, for instance w a list of banned books or malawi's censorship list, etc., etc., all currents of communism's internal and mutually-destructive literary controls. consider the amount of anti-literary energy that was expended over works, over which works of literature were ideologically correct or incorrect. the latter grouped as reactionary, undialectic products of -- [inaudible] etc., etc. variations of these contests survive until today in many parts of the third world, extreme disciples which still roam the jungles, the mountains or urban settlements of nigeria armed with definitive texts and other productive texttology that explicate the history and destiny of mankind from birth to death and excommunicate all others. one such surfaced in nigeria calls it -- [inaudible] translated as "death to all books. "um,
service, the isi come has close ties to the former current and the velte fund and start the taliban back in afghanistan and they started the ltte. the people would give the attacks in india as a counterweight to the military power. all those groups of operational connections now and the experts would be and are inclined to plan operations against the west both at home and abroad, so the question becomes then how vulnerable is the pakistani arsenal and how much would someone get a nuclear complex there's several ways. you could of the clandestine sale of materials which a.q., the father of the program for a number of years you could have a rogue officer take over the nuclear installation work you could have my scenario where the transit from the secured facilities to the front lines and the nuclear alert because that's where it's most vulnerable. so you have a combination of weapons, the country which is hostile, the security service which has ties to the jihadists and a lot of them have been indulged by the establishment and the security, and you have something that is a worry and i woul
the question of education is examined on an international scale. in 1996, the taliban and made it illegal for women to attend school in afghanistan. of this particular policy was discarded in 2001, similar deplorable circumstances still exists in afghanistan and around the world. the limitations and implications of existing education systems are far reaching, yet they are concrete steps that can be taken to work toward combating the cyclical and damaging nature of existing education systems or lack thereof. any institution international jurisdiction can and must answer to global education programs including early childhood in the case of programs. early so that education such as operation head start provides comprehensive health and education, and parent involvement to low-income families. providing technical skills and training to make individual valuable members of the workforce. sets educational programs can also be recognized for their economic dahlia. early sell their education as well as vocational training and educational opportunities are of viable and empowerment programs that mu
to former current jihadists. they help to find and the taliban to fight the russians. back in afghanistan. they fought and started the people he did the mumbai attacks in india. as a counterweight to india military power. all those groups have operational connections to each other now. the experts believe that they would be, and are inclined to plan operations against the west, both at home and abroad. so the question becomes then how vulnerable is the pakistani arsenal? how might someone need a nuclear bomb? there's several ways. you could have a rogue officer come you have a clandestine sale of materials which a.q. khan, the father of the nuclear program of pakistan before a number of years. you have a rogue officer taking over nuclear installation, or you can have my scenario where a bomb in transit from its secure facility the front lines in a nuclear, storm because that's where it's most one of the. you're the combination of weapons, a country which is hostile, a security service which has ties to jihadists. jihadists have been indulged on the establishment military and security, and
Search Results 0 to 14 of about 15 (some duplicates have been removed)

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